The OPIC Blog

In Kenya: Quality education even low income families can afford

Children in a classroom in KenyaIn Kenya, primary school starts at the age of six and runs for eight years, and while the public schools are free to all children, they often suffer from limited resources.

OPIC recently agreed to support a business that is providing an affordable education alternative to thousands of Kenyan families through a series of 237 schools it is building throughout the country. Each school will provide a standardized curriculum at a cost of less than $6 per month per student, a model designed to be both sustainable and affordable. Earlier this year, OPIC agreed to provide a $10 million loan to Bridge International Academies, which expects its schools will educate an estimated 300,000 children by 2022.

Bridge International, which has already opened schools in several locations in Africa, has integrated teacher use of tablet computers into the program to ensure a standardized curriculum. In addition to providing the schools teachers with lessons, the tablet maintains student grades and notes when the teacher arrives or leaves the school, and how long she spends on each lesson.

In addition to the obvious benefit of educating so many low income students, the Bridge project is also expected to have a positive impact in other ways and is projected to create more than 12,000 local jobs in Kenya.


Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • RSS
  • Email

Related Post

OPIC Impact Awards celebrates all the ways our partners advance development

By Judith Pryor OPIC Vice President, Office of External Affairs Last week, I had the honor of serving as MC...

OPIC Impact Awards: A recap in photos

OPIC honored seven partners for excellence in development at the 2016 OPIC Impact Awards July 7. Here’s a look at...

Why entrepreneurs are vital to emerging markets: OPIC featured in Silicon Valley Business Journal

“Innovative thinkers and early adopters exist everywhere: In Silicon Valley, but also in Sub-Saharan Africa; in the legendary startup garages...